Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Wrist Fractures Have An Important Public Health Impact

Wrist fractures have an important personal and public health impact and may play a role in the development of disability in older people, according to a new study published online in the British Medical Journal.

Risk Of Falling Is Overlooked As The Major Cause Of Fractures...

An elderly person's risk of falling is too often overlooked when trying to prevent them from getting serious fractures, for instance of the hip or wrist, according to an article published in the British Medical Journal.

Exercise Associated With Lower Rate Of Fractures In Elderly Women

Home-based exercises followed by voluntary home training seem to be associated with long-term effects on balance and gait (manner of walking), and may help protect high-risk, elderly women from hip fractures, according to a report in the September 27 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Report Predicts Huge Increase In Osteoporotic Fractures Due To Aging Populations

Preliminary findings from an upcoming new report by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) show alarming projections and reveal the poor state of post-fracture care in the Russian Federation and many other countries in the region. The findings were announced at a press conference in St. Petersburg at the IOF Summit of Eastern European and Central Asian Osteoporosis Patient Societies.

Benefits Of Osteoporosis Treatments Outweigh Possible Risk Of Rare Femoral Fractures,...

The occurrence of an unusual type of fracture of the femur, or the thigh bone, is very low in patients with osteoporosis, including those treated with the drug family known as bisphosphonates, according to a new study led by a team of UCSF epidemiologists.

Drugs Used To Treat Osteoporosis Not Linked With Higher Risk Of...

Although some reports have suggested a link between the use of oral bisphosphonates (drugs that prevent the loss of bone mass) and esophageal cancer, analysis of medical data from more than 80,000 patients in the United Kingdom found that use of these drugs was not significantly associated with new cases of esophageal or gastric cancer, according to a study in the August 11 issue of JAMA.

Long Term Use Of Oral Bisphosphonates May Double Risk Of Esophageal...

People who take oral bisphosphonates for bone disease over five years may be doubling their risk of developing oesophageal cancer (cancer of the gullet), according to a new study published online in the British Medical Journal.

Some Bisphosphonates Users Unfamiliar With Drug’s Possible Side Effects On Oral...

People undergoing bisphosphonate therapy to prevent or treat osteoporosis (a thinning of the bones) may be unfamiliar with the drug and possible adverse side effects on oral health, according to a study in the May issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA).

Common Osteoporosis Drugs Are Associated With A Decrease In Risk Of...

Women who take some types of bone-building drugs used to prevent and treat osteoporosis may be at lower risk of breast cancer, according to a study by U.S. researchers published in the British Journal of Cancer.

Quantity Vs. Quality: Long-Term Use Of Bone-Building Osteoporosis Drugs

Bisphosphonate treatments, proven to enhance bone density and reduce fracture incidence in post-menopausal women, may adversely affect bone quality and increase risk of atypical fractures of the femur when used for four or more years, according to preliminary research presented at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).

Osteoporosis Drugs May Boost Cancer Risk

People who take bisphosphonates, or bone-strengthening drugs for osteoporosis, may have a slightly higher risk of developing esophageal cancer, especially if they take them for several years, a study out this week in the British Journal of Medicine finds.

Women With Osteoporosis Suffer More If They Have Previously Broken a...

Osteoporosis is more common in women who have fractured bones when they were younger -- and they experience a similar loss in health-related quality of life as those with arthritis, lung disease, diabetes and other chronic diseases.