Sunday, April 30, 2017

Too Much Vitamin D Linked to Strokes and Heart Attack

The level of vitamin D in our blood should neither be too high nor to low. Scientists from the University of Copenhagen are the...

New Hope for Stroke Recovery: Mechanism for Repairing Damaged Brain Cells...

A previously unknown mechanism through which the brain produces new nerve cells after a stroke has been discovered at Lund University and Karolinska Institutet...

Bananas Aren’t Best Source of Potassium For Reducing Stroke Risk

Until middle age, women tend to have lower stroke risks than men. But then menopause happens, and a swirling mix of hormones changes everything....

Gum Health Linked to Heart Disease, Diabetes, Rheumatoid Arthritis and Prostate...

Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder that causes gum tissues to pull away from the teeth, allowing bacteria to accumulate and trigger an inflammatory reaction that leads to the loss of bone tissues and teeth.

Significantly Higher Risk of Stroke in Young Adults with Insomnia

The risk of stroke may be much higher in people with insomnia compared to those who don't have trouble sleeping, according to new research...

Mummy CT Scans Show Preindustrial Hunter Gatherers Had Clogged Arteries

Like nearly 4.6 million Americans, ancient hunter-gatherers also suffered from clogged arteries, revealing that the plaque build-up causing blood clots, heart attacks and strokes is not just a result of fatty diets or couch potato habits, according to new research in the journal The Lancet.

Stressed Proteins Can Cause Blood Clots For Hours

New research from Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) and the Puget Sound Blood Center (PSBC) has revealed how stresses of flow in the small blood vessels of the heart and brain could cause a common protein to change shape and form dangerous blood clots. The scientists were surprised to find that the proteins could remain in the dangerous, clot-initiating shape for up to five hours before returning to their normal, healthy shape.

Every Single Junk Food Meal Damages Your Arteries, New Study Reveals

A single junk food meal -- composed mainly of saturated fat -- is detrimental to the health of the arteries, while no damage occurs after consuming a Mediterranean meal rich in good fats such as mono-and polyunsaturated fatty acids, according to researchers at the University of Montreal-affiliated ÉPIC Center of the Montreal Heart Institute. The Mediterranean meal may even have a positive effect on the arteries.

An Apple A Day Lowers Level Of Blood Chemical Linked To...

Eating an apple a day might in fact help keep the cardiologist away, new research suggests. In a study of healthy, middle-aged adults, consumption of one apple a day for four weeks lowered by 40 percent blood levels of a substance linked to hardening of the arteries.

Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Appear To Be At Increased Risk For...

A study that included more than 45,000 residents of Sweden with rheumatoid arthritis finds that individuals with this disease had an associated higher risk of venous thromboembolism (a blood clot that forms within a vein), and that this elevated risk was stable for 10 years after the time of diagnosis, according to a study in the October 3 issue of JAMA.

Hidden Stroke Impairment Leaves Thousands Suffering In Silence

Most people are completely unaware of one of stroke's most common, debilitating but invisible impairments, according to the first awareness survey of its kind in Canada released October 1 at the Canadian Stroke Congress. Thirty community volunteers trained by the York-Durham Aphasia Centre, a March of Dimes Canada program, collaborated with researchers from two Ontario universities in a survey of 832 adults in southern Ontario.

‘Cafeteria Diet’ Hastens Stroke Risk: High-Sugar, High-Salt Intake Creates ‘a Ticking...

The fat- and sugar-rich Western diet leads to a lifetime of health problems, dramatically increasing the risk of stroke or death at a younger age, according to a study presented October 1 at the Canadian Stroke Congress. Researchers found that a high-calorie, high-sugar, high-sodium diet nicknamed the 'cafeteria diet' induced most symptoms of metabolic syndrome -- a combination of high levels of cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure and obesity -- in rats after only two months.