Sunday, March 7, 2021

Advanced Cough and Lung Support for Upper Respiratory Infections (Colds and...

Coughs are one of the main reasons patients visit doctors, both Western and alternative. Many people ignore their cough until it becomes apparent that it’s not going away on its own. Besides treatment for daytime cough, patients also seek relief from night-time coughing, painful chest sensations, sore throat while coughing, fatigue and headache. Western medicine offers very few choices for dealing with cough, primarily antibiotics, antitussives (cough suppressants) and expectorants such as guaifenesin (found in products such as Robitussin®, Anti-Tuss® and Scot-Tussin®).

Reversing Osteoporosis Reduces Fracture Risks in 78-Year-Old Patient

By Hyla Cass, MD Recently, one of my long-time patients, a 78-year-old woman named Jean, called to tell me that her Beverly Hills endocrinologist was...

Reversing Insulin Resistance to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes

While Regaining Control of Metabolism to Curb Carbohydrate Cravings, Control Weight A recent article in the New York Times reveals that 800,000 New Yorkers – more than...

Cucurbita Pumpkin Rejuvenates ßeta Cells, Restores Insulin Production

An extract derived from pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia) may improve blood glucose levels in diabetics and exert antioxidant effects, according to a new study. If...

Bladder Condition May Worsen Insomnia Symptoms In Older Adults

A new study suggests that the bladder condition nocturia (the need to wake up throughout the night to urinate ) may worsen the already poor sleep of older adults with insomnia. "The results raise the clinical question of treating nocturia to help individuals with insomnia," said Jamie Zeitzer, PhD, the study's lead author. "That is, could much of the insomnia or poor sleep that occurs in older individuals be alleviated by treatment of nocturia? Of course, the opposite is quite possible – that proper treatment of insomnia might reduce the occurrence of nocturia as well."

Patient Expectations Of Acute Bronchitis Not Consistent With The Best Evidence

New research from the University of Georgia exposes a large discrepancy in the length of time patients expect an acute cough illness, also called acute bronchitis, to last and the reality of the illness. This mismatch may be a factor in the over-prescription of antibiotics.

Herbal Treatments for Postmenopausal Symptoms Recommended by Journal

Herbal Treatments for Postmenopausal Symptoms May Be Recommended as an Alternative to Hormone Replacement Therapy Jan. 10, 2013 — Herbal and complementary medicines could be...

Increase In Allergies Is Not from Being Too Clean, Just Losing...

A new scientific report out October 3 from the International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene (IFH)[i] dismantles the myth that the epidemic rise in allergies in recent years has happened because we're living in sterile homes and overdoing hygiene.

Guidelines Help Family Physicians Evaluate, Manage Urinary Incontinence For Women

Millions of women experience a loss of bladder control, or urinary incontinence, in their lifetime. It's a common and often embarrassing problem that many patients don't bring up with their doctors -- and when they do, it may be mentioned as a casual side note during a visit for more pressing medical issues.

Overactive Bladder Linked To Sleep Apnea In Women

Sleep apnea in women has been linked to overactive bladder syndrome in a new study. The research, presented Monday (Sept. 3, 2012) at the European Respiratory Society's Annual Congress in Vienna, has provided new evidence suggesting a connection between the two conditions.

Corticosteroids Not Effective For Treating Acute Sinusitis, Study Suggests

Corticosteroids, frequently prescribed to alleviate acute sinusitis, show no clinical benefit in treating the condition, according to a randomized controlled trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

How Colds Cause Coughs And Wheezes

Cold-like infections make 'cough receptors' in the airways more sensitive, making asthmatics more prone to bouts of coughing and wheezing, reveal scientists presenting their findings at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Conference in Dublin. The work could lead to drugs that reduce virus-induced coughing in those suffering chronic lung diseases