Saturday, October 19, 2019

Sleep Apnea May Raise Risk of Dementia, Study Finds

Sleep apnea, a fairly common, treatable disorder that causes people to stop breathing momentarily while they sleep, may lead to cognitive impairment and even...

Poor Sleep Quality Increases Risk of High Blood Pressure

Reduced slow wave sleep (SWS) is a powerful predictor for developing high blood pressure in older men, according to new research in Hypertension: Journal of...

Sleep Interruptions Erode Memory

Storing Information Requires a Continuous Supply of Z's Continuity of sleep, not just the total hours of nightly slumber, is crucial to forming and retaining...

Physical Activity Impacts Overall Quality Of Sleep

People sleep significantly better and feel more alert during the day if they get at least 150 minutes of exercise a week, a new study concludes. A nationally representative sample of more than 2,600 men and women, ages 18-85, found that 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity a week, which is the national guideline, provided a 65 percent improvement in sleep quality.

Circadian Rhythms Have Profound Influence On Metabolic Output

By analyzing the hundreds of metabolic products present in the liver, researchers with the UC Irvine Center for Epigenetics & Metabolism have discovered that circadian rhythms -- our own body clock -- greatly control the production of such key building blocks as amino acids, carbohydrates and lipids.

Coordinating The Circadian Clock: Molecular Pair Controls Time-Keeping And Fat Metabolism

The 24-hour internal clock controls many aspects of human behavior and physiology, including sleep, blood pressure, and metabolism. Disruption in circadian rhythms leads to increased incidence of many diseases, including metabolic disease and cancer. Each cell of the body has its own internal timing mechanism, which is controlled by proteins that keep one another in check.

Scientists Redraw The Blueprint Of The Body’s Biological Clock

The discovery of a major gear in the biological clock that tells the body when to sleep and metabolize food may lead to new drugs to treat sleep problems and metabolic disorders, including diabetes. Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, led by Ronald M. Evans, a professor in Salk's Gene Expression Laboratory, showed that two cellular switches found on the nucleus of mouse cells, known as REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, are essential for maintaining normal sleeping and eating cycles and for metabolism of nutrients from food.

Overweight? New Research Explains How Proper Sleep Is Important for Healthy...

If you're counting calories to lose weight, that may be only part of the weight loss equation says a new research report published online in The FASEB Journal. In the report, French scientists show that impairments to a gene known to be responsible for our internal body clocks, called "Rev-Erb alpha," leads to excessive weight gain and related health problems.

Top Risk Of Stroke For Normal-Weight Adults: Getting Under 6 Hours...

Habitually sleeping less than six hours a night significantly increases the risk of stroke symptoms among middle-age to older adults who are of normal weight and at low risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to a study of 5,666 people followed for up to three years.

Sleep Deprivation Effect On The Immune System Mirrors Physical Stress

Severe sleep loss jolts the immune system into action, reflecting the same type of immediate response shown during exposure to stress, a new study reports. Researchers in the Netherlands and United Kingdom compared the white blood cell counts of 15 healthy young men under normal and severely sleep-deprived conditions. The greatest changes were seen in the white blood cells known as granulocytes, which showed a loss of day-night rhythmicity, along with increased numbers, particularly at night.

Severe Sleep Apnea Tied To Four-Fold Increase In Cancer Risk

Obstructive sleep apnea, a breathing disorder linked to heart disease and depression, may heighten the risk of cancer as well. A two-decade study shows that people with severe sleep apnea could be four times as likely to die of cancer as people without the condition.

Overactive Bladder Linked To Sleep Apnea In Women

Sleep apnea in women has been linked to overactive bladder syndrome in a new study. The research, presented Monday (Sept. 3, 2012) at the European Respiratory Society's Annual Congress in Vienna, has provided new evidence suggesting a connection between the two conditions.